Panel of Experts

Karl Schellscheidt

SAT Prep Expert

  • BSE, Princeton University '90
  • M.A., Secondary Education Seton Hall University '93
  • J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School '00

Fred Hargadon

Dean of Admission

  • Swarthmore College
    (1964-1969)
  • Stanford University
    (1969-1984)
  • Princeton University
    (1988-2003)

Don Betterton

Financial Aid Expert

  • Director of Financial Aid, Princeton University (1973-2006)
  • Certified College Planner
  • Principal, Betterton College Planning

Seamus Malin

Admission Expert

  • Harvard University
    Dir. of Financial Aid
    (1966-1977)
    Asst. Dean of Admission
    (1977-1987)
    International Office Director
    (1987-2002)

May 2009 SAT Scores

ACT   SAT
Karl Schellscheidt -

college admissions expert advice from eprep.com
May 2009 SAT scores will be available online starting tomorrow, May 21, 2009.

In order to access your scores, you’ll need your College Board user name and password. If you have them, CLICK HERE.

If you do not yet have an online account with the College Board, CLICK HERE to create one and access your scores.

If you’re not happy with your scores for any reason, CLICK HERE to learn about ePrep’s video-based study programs. Whether you decide to retake the SAT on June 6th or next fall, ePrep has a study program that will help you increase your scores significantly.

Good luck!

PS If you are frustrated with the SAT and want to try the ACT, ePrep has a study program for you too. Just CLICK HERE to learn more.

ePrep Summer Camps

ACT   SSAT   SAT
Karl Schellscheidt -

eprep test prep videoePrep is hosting three summer camps in Princeton, New Jersey.

SSAT June 15-19
SAT June 22-26
ACT June 29 - July 3

If you are interested in learning more about the camps, click here!

How to Eat for the Big Test

ACT   PSAT   SSAT   Strategies   SAT
Guest Columnist -

college admissions expert advice from eprep.comTest Prep - How to Eat for Standardized Test Classes and the Test Itself

Getting ready for a standardized test can be an intimidating prospect. The goal in both your studies and testing should be to take all distractions away, including those grumbling in your tummy.

These days on the internet a quick search of ‘Brain Foods’ will pull up all kinds of wacky supplements and diets that profess to have the ability of supercharging your most important organ. But the real truth to eating for a serious test or test prep class is to keep it simple.

No Distraction, Remember?

The overall goal here is to ace that test. And as any good prep class will teach you, your goal should be to eliminate distractions. While it may be advisable to modify your diet, you certainly don’t want to make any radical changes that could give you an upset stomach or give you the need to go running to the nearest bathroom.

Your best bet is simply to eat some light foods which are already a part of your diet, but try to avoid anything heavy that will slow you down and make you tired.

Establish a Pattern

If you are going to make any changes, or incorporate foods that may encourage your brain to function at its max capacity, make the changes long before the test while you are studying. If you build a pattern of eating that corresponds to a pattern of study then there will essentially be no change once the real test comes around. This is a great way to program your body to respond mentally when certain foods are only associated with studying, like mints, which have been shown to increase brain function.
Beware of the Caffeine Crash

If coffee is part of your regular study regiment then by all means feel free to incorporate it into your testing regiment as well. Just be aware of two key factors that may affect you when it comes to coffee: 1) The Caffeine Crash. 2) The necessity of a bathroom.

Crashing down from a caffeine high could be the worst thing that could happen to you in the middle of a test, so remember to take it easy when juicing up. And that liquid is going to have to come out some time, so remember the second reason not to gulp the stuff down right before the big finale.

Snacks?

Last minute munchables are a good idea, but you don’t want to be Napoleon Dynamite and snack on a secret stash of tater-tots mid-test. For one thing what if the guy/gal next to you catches you and demands his/her fair share?

But seriously, snacking during the test is overall inadvisable. During most standardized tests you will be under time constraints, and you shouldn’t waste valuable calculating time by stuffing your face. However, snacking immediately before the test may be a good idea, particularly if it is going to be a long session like most standardized tests.

Nuts, fruit, and a little water are a perfect combo for this pre-test appetite quencher. And since studies show that mint is proven to increase brain function, you may want to include one to suck on during the test just in case.

This post was contributed by Katie Wilson, who writes about the top universities online. She welcomes your feedback at KatieWilson06 at gmail.com

Need Blind Up to a Point

Eric Barnes -

eprep test prep videoAccording to a New York Times story running today, “many colleges are looking more favorably on wealthier applicants as they make their admissions decisions this year.” Colleges across the US have begun downsizing their administrations and school budgets in line with the economic climate, but financial aid has long been considered a safe haven. The past decade has witnessed an increase in “need-blind” aid by colleges in the effort to attract the most diverse student body. However, the current economic decline is driving more families than ever to request financial aid. Something has to give.

Impact of Dropping the SAT

ACT   Admissions   SAT
Catherine -

eprep test prep videoOne of my former students sent me this article from insidehigered.com. While the results of the study described are not too surprising, I must say that I really enjoyed the posted comments. They were, for the most part, thoughtful, and they covered a healthy mix of viewpoints.

March 2009 SAT Scores

SAT
Karl Schellscheidt -

college admissions expert advice from eprep.com
March 2009 SAT scores will be available online starting April 7th.

In order to access your scores, you’ll need your College Board user name and password. If you have them, CLICK HERE.

If you do not yet have an online account with the College Board, CLICK HERE to create one and access your scores.

If you’re not happy with your scores for any reason, CLICK HERE to learn about ePrep’s 300-Point Guarantee!

Good luck!

The Day Before the March 14 SAT Test

SAT   ePrep
Randi -

eprep test prep videoWe want to wish all our ePrep students best of luck on this Saturday’s SAT test. You should feel very confident based on the effort and practice you’ve put in over these past several months. Following the ePrep method of practice, grade and review (under simulated, test day conditions!) you are well prepared to take on the SAT.

You might consider reviewing our ePrep strategy session videos this week as a final preparation going into the test. Summarized below are links to many key video lessons focused on test taking strategies.

SAT Test Day: The Night Before and Morning Of
Real SAT Stories: Second Guessing on the SAT
SAT Directions: Optimize Your Time on Test Day
When to Guess on the SAT Writing Section
When to Guess on the SAT Critical Reading Section
When to Guess on the SAT Math Section
SAT Sentence Completion Questions: When to Guess?
Don’t Blame the Chicken Pox for SAT Math Mistakes
Approach to SAT Math Problems
Habeus Answer, or Show Yourself the Answer!
Mastering Your SAT Test Weaknesses
SAT Questions…Easiest to Hardest
Autopilot - Don’t Set a Course for a Lower SAT Score
A Lesson from a Course in Wills, Trusts and Estates
Bubbling: Avoid Mistakes in Your Answer Key
Please Put Down Your Pencil!
The Dreaded SAT Experimental Section

Additionally, we’ve included a link to our presentation (in PDF format) on “what to do the night before and the morning of the SAT test” right here: Webinar Presentation - Night Before the SAT

Best of luck on Saturday!

Dealing with the Pressure of Test Day

SAT
Guest Columnist -

When it comes to taking a standardized test, many students feel the pressure with startling results. For a great number, the future could be quite literally hang in the balance. There is certainly no shortage of programs available to help increase vocabulary and test taking abilities, but even the strongest individuals have been known to cave under pressure. Continue reading strategies for dealing with test day stress and anxiety.

Dream Big – Visualize Success

This is a practice used by people the world over. See yourself taking the test and breezing through it effortlessly. You have studied and worked hard for this very moment and it is your time to shine. Tune all of the pressure out and focus on what dreams will come once you have performed well on the test. Keep your eyes on the prize.

Disconnect, Disengage, and Focus

This may at first sound counter-intuitive, but it is a great thing to do before getting ready to take a standardized test. Stay at home, disconnect, and focus on what needs to be done. Don’t engage in any activities besides taking care of yourself the night before and the morning of your test. Turn off the cell phone, stay off the internet, and refrain from participating in anything that could ultimately distract you.

Get Plenty of Sleep the Night Before

While it may be very difficult to get sleep the night before something as important and life-changing as a standardized test, it is very important to get eight or more hours of sleep. A well-rested mind could mean the difference between success and failure and a tired mind will operate clumsily in the cloud of fatigue.

Eat a Good Breakfast

Food can help ease your nerves, regardless of your fear of nausea being a main result of eating. Oatmeal, nutrition bars, or just plain cereal are better for you than showing up to take a stressful test on an empty stomach. Don’t allow hunger to be your main distraction come test time.

Silence is Golden

Take a few moments to yourself at the testing center to sit quietly and get your bearings. Stay calm and get in line when you’re ready. If you’re early, do your best to refrain from idle chatter by staying out of the way until the line starts moving and people are being sent to their respective rooms.

Any time throughout the test that you are feeling stressed, remember to take some deep breaths and realign your focus as necessary. The test may be scary, but it will be over soon enough.

By-line:
This post was contributed by Holly McCarthy, who writes on the subject of a recognized online university. She invites your feedback at hollymccarthy12 at gmail dot com

Rethinking College Prep Costs in Tough Times

Eric Barnes -

A recent article in the New York Times highlights the dilemma today’s parents face as they prepare their children for college during these tough economic times. The author describes the suite of consulting and test prep services that are almost obligatory to ensure that our children have the best chances of gaining admission at selective colleges. Just as we’ve heard the saying “you never got fired for hiring IBM,” many parents previously overlooked the $1,000+ price tag of an SAT classroom course (we won’t name names :) without researching alternatives. That was then, this is now.

“My friends and I smugly tell one another that all we needed to be prepared for the SAT in the late 1970s were two sharpened No. 2 pencils. And campus tours? The first time I visited the University of California, Berkeley — one of two universities I applied to — was when I moved there. But that was about three decades ago.”

While parents today will not (and should not) abandon the notion of test prep for their children, they are no longer willing to secure such services without regard to cost and without due diligence. This is where ePrep comes in and takes center stage. We at ePrep have built a company around the notion of delivering premium test preparation products and services directly to students of all income levels through the power of online video. Uncontroverted studies show that ePrep’s learning model is significantly more effective than traditional classroom learning models. Yet, ePrep deliver’s its products and services at a fraction of the cost of classroom courses. As the economy weeds out companies with overpriced and inferior products and services, ePrep will continue its rise to the head of the proverbial class. Thanks for your participation.

ePrep Summer Camps in Princeton

Events   ACT   News   College Planning   SSAT   SAT
Catherine -

eprep test prep videoePrep summer camps are a bit different than traditional academic camps. How?

1. The Instructors: All ePrep camps will be taught by Karl Schellscheidt and Kathy Doyle. Both Karl and Kathy are Princeton University graduates (1990-Karl, 1993-Kathy) and career educators. When you sign up for most other summer camps, you have no idea who will be teaching the course. You might get lucky; you might not. If you live in the greater Princeton community, there’s no point in taking the chance.

2. The Online Component: When most other academic camps end, they end. Students are then left with months of nothing to do before the fall testing season. ePrep summer camps offer one week of intense in-person training. During the week-long camp, students are introduced to one of ePrep’s premium, video-based, on line study programs. Thus, ePrep campers continue guided preparation at their convenience for the balance of the summer and into the fall. In other words, ePrep continues to guide students right into September and October. No other summer program offers this advantage.

For more information on ePrep summer camps, click here.

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