Panel of Experts

Karl Schellscheidt

SAT Prep Expert

  • BSE, Princeton University '90
  • M.A., Secondary Education Seton Hall University '93
  • J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School '00

Fred Hargadon

Dean of Admission

  • Swarthmore College
    (1964-1969)
  • Stanford University
    (1969-1984)
  • Princeton University
    (1988-2003)

Don Betterton

Financial Aid Expert

  • Director of Financial Aid, Princeton University (1973-2006)
  • Certified College Planner
  • Principal, Betterton College Planning

Seamus Malin

Admission Expert

  • Harvard University
    Dir. of Financial Aid
    (1966-1977)
    Asst. Dean of Admission
    (1977-1987)
    International Office Director
    (1987-2002)

The Valedictorian at Princeton University

Karl Schellscheidt

The valedictorian at Princeton University almost every year is a student who majored in math, engineering or one of the sciences, not a student who majored in the liberal arts. Why? The answer makes sense if you think about it.

The subject matter of math, engineering and the sciences tends to be more objective, or black and white, than that of the liberal arts. In a math class, for example, every homework, quiz, test and final exam problem will have a single correct answer. All a student needs to do is calculate and record the correct answer (more…)

SAT Questions…Easiest to Hardest

Karl Schellscheidt

Most students know that the problems on any given SAT section are ordered, in general, so that they progress from easiest at the beginning to hardest toward the end. Here’s an example that illustrates one way you can use this knowledge to increase your score.

In a twenty-question practice math section, one of my students answered number seventeen incorrectly. The problem involved increasing a price by 10% only to then decrease the new price by 20%. The question was, “What percent of the original price was the final price?” Her answer was 90%. She arrived at her answer by quickly adding 10% to the original 100% to get 110% and then simply subtracting 20% from the 110% to get her final answer of 90%. Sounds easy and somewhat logical, right? (more…)

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