Panel of Experts

Karl Schellscheidt

SAT Prep Expert

  • BSE, Princeton University '90
  • M.A., Secondary Education Seton Hall University '93
  • J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School '00

Fred Hargadon

Dean of Admission

  • Swarthmore College
    (1964-1969)
  • Stanford University
    (1969-1984)
  • Princeton University
    (1988-2003)

Don Betterton

Financial Aid Expert

  • Director of Financial Aid, Princeton University (1973-2006)
  • Certified College Planner
  • Principal, Betterton College Planning

Seamus Malin

Admission Expert

  • Harvard University
    Dir. of Financial Aid
    (1966-1977)
    Asst. Dean of Admission
    (1977-1987)
    International Office Director
    (1987-2002)

ePrep’s Reaction to WSJ Article

Karl Schellscheidt

college admissions expert advice from eprep.comI few people asked me to comment on yesterday’s Wall Street Journal article by J. Hechinger. I will make comments from two different perspectives.

Lawyer Perspective: The lawyer in me enjoyed discussing, with friends and colleagues, the article’s double standards, flawed assertions, inconsistencies, and contradictions. For the calls I received from some old friends, I thank Mr. Hechinger.

Educator Perspective: The teacher in me happens to agree with the article’s thesis wholeheartedly: Many families do spend way too much money on SAT preparation services that simply do not deliver results. This is exactly why I founded ePrep back in 2005. After spending 15 years as a teacher and private tutor, I decided to create a low-cost preparation product that would effectively and efficiently do two things: (1) help students increase their SAT scores and (2) help students prepare for the academic challenges of college and life beyond. I am glad to say that ePrep does both.

Today happens to the be the day that May 2nd SAT scores became available online. By noon, I had already received dozens of emails and phone calls from parents who spent around $200 on ePrep study programs that helped their children increase their overall SAT scores by more than 200 points on average. While “average coaching” may yield only modest results as Mr. Henchinger points out, “eprepping” with an expert certainly bucks the current trend.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks